Category / Editorials

  • We are in the midst of a national decision (some might argue it is a sham, others that the choices are only by degree and not of great substance) on who should be the next President of the United States. Debates on the left vacillate between arguments that it does not matter who is elected since the […]

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  • In a recent editorial in the New York Times (New York Times Editorial, 2012), rising income inequality and the unbalanced debt burden are identified as the reason our economy is struggling, and why (by implication), unless this situation is remedied, austerity measures are destined to fail. Clearly, this revelation does not come as news to […]

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  • As the country was engaged in a primary campaign that pitted Barack Obama against Hillary Clinton, many saw it as a battle between the candidate of a progressive, post-racial America and the representative of the traditional political forces that had defined the Democratic Party for decades. The fact that this country was at a political […]

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  • In this issue of the journal, William Robinson offers his analysis of the rise of transnational elites emerging outside of the traditional frame of nation-based capitalism. What is significant, in large part, is that unlike their national-capital predecessors, this new cadre has little concern for all that we refer to as social reproduction, industrialization, and […]

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  • Even the most isolationist persons among us cannot help but be aware of how connected we are to the rest of the world, and for a moment recognize that perhaps we cannot disassociate ourselves from the global political economy. Aside from the endless noise about how we live in a globalized economy, and talk of […]

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  • In his account of the turbulent decade of the 1960s, in which New York City dealt with endemic corruption, racism and economic distress, English begins by telling us “(u)ntold thousands, perhaps millions, have fallen prey to the perils of municipal dysfunction, to the growing pains of a city forced to adjust to violent demographic shifts, […]

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  • At the end of the 19th century, Werner Sombart (1976 [1906]) asked what has frequently become a repeated question: why is there no socialism in the USA? At the time, Europe’s workers were constantly organizing and pushing for greater participation and a share of the economic benefits of the Industrial Revolution, joining unions and forming […]

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  • The November 2010 election in the USA resulted in a wave of conservative candidates winning  in local and national contests, and taking office in January 2011. Most analysts argued that this election result was due to a combination of typically small voter turnout for by-elections, a strong turnout by zealous advocates of the now well known […]

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  • It would seem that 2011 is going to be a pivotal year. Conservative Republicans, many under the banner of the Tea Party, have captured the US House of Representatives and promise to correct the course this country has taken. Echoing the actions of the coalition government in the UK, these members of Congress announced an […]

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  • We live in truly bizarre times. In the midst of what everyone routinely refers to as a major economic crisis, with the unemployment rate hovering near 10 percent and ever more people leave the ranks of the unemployed discouraged and resigned to never finding another job, and when fis- cal austerity is the word of […]

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