Category / Editorials

  • The last century ended in a decade of relative prosperity, a generally strong economy, and the ability of the working classes (indeed most people) to mask the fact that real wages had remained more or less stagnant for almost 30 years through access to seemingly unlimited credit sustaining ever growing levels of consumption. Consumption is […]

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  • We are inundated almost daily with word that the economy remains sluggish, that we may be in for  a double dip recession, that there is a worry about a deflation, that the economy is barely limping  along, that unemployment rates will remain high, that unemployed workers over 55 may never find  a job that pays […]

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  • Government: the office, authority or function of governing. Governing: having control or rule over oneself. Governance: the activity of governing. Accordingly, governance is a set of decisions and processes made to reflect social expectations through the manage- ment or leadership of the government (by extension, under liberal democratic ideals, the will of ‘the people’ as […]

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  • We often forget how fast things change; for example, my father was born at a time when a wagon ride to the major city center 50 miles away took half a day and by the time he died almost a century later he could travel across a major ocean and traverse a continent in the […]

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  • In his farewell address on January 17, 1961 outgoing President Eisenhower coined the now well worn phrase “military industrial complex” in his warning that there is a danger in the confluence of the government’s military establishment and a growing industrial based serving those interests. Specifically, he cautioned that “(i)n the councils of govern- ment, we […]

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  • The term ‘glocal’ seems to have originated in business circles, often attributed to the Japanese business practice of expanding global enterprise by focusing on local conditions. Of late it also comes to mean how local actors can organize activities in the locality to counter the effects of globalization on economic and social vitality. Some may […]

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  • When James O’Connor (2002 [1973]) first wrote The Fiscal Crisis of the State in 1973, later followed by Erik Olin Wright’s (1977) Class, Crisis and the State, progressive and radical scholars were debating whether or not there was a relative autonomy of the state (see, for instance, Miller 1986) in contrast to Marx’s position that […]

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  • First, the good news: President Barack Obama nominated Judge Sonia Sotomayor as the next Justice of the US Supreme Court (by the time this appears in print, Judge Sotomayor will presumably have been approved and is now sitting on the US Supreme Court). A native of the Bronx, New York and the child of Puerto […]

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